tech competence

Sam Talks Legal Marketing, Tech, and More on IusLaw WebRadio

A fun and wide-ranging discussion about marketing, technology, opportunities for innovative lawyers, lawyer-rating services, the blockchain, and more.

Hiring Young Lawyers is NOT an IT Solution

Lawyers who have fallen behind the times often try what probably seems like a good solution: hire a young digital native and give them the job of updating the firm's technology.

4 Ways to Secure Your Clients’ Information

A lawyer shall make reasonable efforts to prevent the inadvertent or unauthorized disclosure of, or unauthorized access to, information relating to the representation of a client. (Rule 1.6(c).) So what are reasonable efforts when it comes to your clients’ information stored on your computer? You have to make an effort, obviously. But how much effort […]

The Calculus of Risk, Tech Competence Edition

Rule 1.6(c)'s "reasonable efforts" is a duty of care. So let’s see how the calculus of risk plays out when we apply it to computer security.

The Lawyers’ Guide to Hacking Threats

As quickly as we build new technology to keep criminals out, hackers are working around the clock, and using sophisticated tools like Darkode, to climb your security walls. Prevent these attacks with a

Podcast #51: Legal Tech Trends That Defined 2015, with Bob Ambrogi

Bob Ambrogi has had his finger on the pulse of legal technology for a long time, and in this episode he talks about the ten trends that defined 2015. Plus, a reluctant preview of the trends that might define 2016.

The Consequences of Technological Incompetence

Being a Luddite can be expensive, embarassing, and potentially disastrous for lawyers and clients. There are high prices to pay for being too proud (or lazy) to learn how the Internet, social media, and that box on your desk work.

70% of Lawyers Think Words Make Email Safe, Are Incompetent

If you think a confidentiality statement in your email counts as a precaution when you are sending confidential information, you are incompetent.

Legal Competence in the Digital Age

The rule of competence requires a lawyer to possess the “skill” reasonably necessary for representation, and it would be a losing argument to say that any lawyer today can competently represent a client without knowing the basics of technology.

You Already Have an Ethical Obligation to be Technologically Competent

Sooner or later, your clients will find another lawyer if you waste their money and time on basic tasks because you aren’t proficient with your technology.