legal research

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Podcast #54: Open Access to Law, with Sarah Glassmeyer & Ed Walters

Sarah Glassmeyer is trying to get to the bottom of open access to law, and Ed Walters is trying to build a company based on access to that law. Both share their frustrations and wishes for open access on today’s podcast. Plus, lawyers are terrible at client intake. News at 11. Law-Firm Intake: Lawyers Dropping […]

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Briefs: QuickBooks Goes Online, Fastcase Sues Casemaker, the Texas Law Hawk Eats Tacos, Etc.

Intuit Removes APIs from QuickBooks Desktop and Shifts Focus to QuickBooks Online In a press release announcing its new integration with QuickBooks Online, Rocket Matter dropped this bomb: As Intuit changes its strategic focus to the cloud, they are eliminating communication channels (APIs) to their desktop product that companies rely on for synchronization. In other words, […]

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Legal Tech is Solving All the Wrong Problems

Law has a tech problem. No, I am not talking about how we are a bunch of Luddites. Rather, I am talking about the idea that we seem unable to figure out how to leverage technology for the greater ease of the profession.

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Support the Legal Information Institute (LII) and Free Access to Law

If you have ever used the LII, or if you agree that everyone should be able to access the law, please make a donation.

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Internet Tools for Researching Opposing Counsel, Judges, and Juries

Knowing the ins and outs of how other courtroom players think is a key ingredient in successful litigation. Here's how to do it.

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The Dos and Don’ts of Researching Judges and Juries Online

It makes sense to research potential jurors, and social media makes it easier than ever. But courts have only recently begun to issue guidance now that researching jurors and other courtroom players online is becoming an increasingly common practice. Researching judges, too, has its advantages. Some jurisdictions, like California, allow you to strike a judge once per case without establishing bias. Although there are limitations […]

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Podcast #37: Internet Ninja Research Tricks with Carole Levitt & Mark Rosch

The Internet is a powerful tool for research that few people know how to use well. Carole Levitt and Mark Rosch are two of those people. They move through the Internet like ninjas through a moonless night. Before we talk to Carole and Mark, we argue about whether Nikki Black is right that 50% of […]

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Podcast #34: Pablo Arredondo on Getting Lawyers to Collaborate

Casetext VP Pablo Arredondo discusses what it takes to get lawyers to collaborate. But first, why law firms shouldn't serve clients.

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Casetext and Law Genius: Wikipedia for Law?

Once hidden behind the walls of Westlaw and Lexis Nexis, the law is quickly becoming open-source. Can Law Genius and Casetext Wikipedia the law and make the old guard irrelevant?

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ROSS: Artificial Intelligence–Powered Legal Research

ROSS is a Toronto, Canada startup that promises to answer legal questions using IBM’s Watson super computer. ROSS provides you a highly relevant answer, not 1000s of results, to your question posed in natural language, not keywords. ROSS monitors the law for changes that can positively/negatively affect your case, instead of flooding you with legal […]

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PacerPro is a Better Way to Use PACER

If you have anything to do with the federal courts, do yourself a favor and sign up for a free PacerPro account right now.

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Bestlaw for Chrome Adds the Features Westlaw Forgot

Joe Mornin, a 3L at UC Berkeley School of Law (Boalt Hall), built Bestlaw, a free browser extension for Google Chrome that adds a bunch of useful features to WestlawNext.

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Reduce Legal Research Costs with Google Scholar

If you are seeking ways to reduce legal research costs, you should use Google Scholar to find cases and secondary sources — for free.

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Bankruptcy Court Thinks its Recordings Are More Valuable Than Justin Bieber’s

The Minnesota bankruptcy court just announced (pdf) that it will be making digital audio files of court proceedings available to the public through PACER for $2.40 each. That’s substantially more than Bieber’s singles go for, and probably no better for dancing. What I really wonder, however, is whether the court system is making a profit […]

Publishing the Law For Posterity #LVI2012

One of my favorite talks at the Law Via the Internet Conference turned out to be from Frank Wagner, retired U.S. Supreme Court Reporter of Decisions.