Avvo Advisor: Can You Help a Client in 15 Minutes?


Free: 10 Things the Best Law-Firm Website Designs Have in Common

For seven years, Lawyerist has published an annual list of the best law firm websites. Now, you can find out what they have in common.

If so, Avvo Advisor might be for you. Here’s how it works for lawyers:

If you’re available, Avvo notifies you via text when someone purchases a session in your state and practice area. Respond to the text to claim the session, then call the client back within 15 minutes for the consultation.

You’ll collect $39 for each call (so far, Avvo is not taking a cut, to avoid fee-sharing concerns).

Related“New from Avvo: On-Demand, Fixed-Fee Legal Advice”
“Avvo’s 15 Minute Solution”
Simple Justice

Since it looks like any lawyer can sign up to take calls and the client has no control over which lawyer takes the call, I’ve asked Avvo to clarify what it means by top-rated in its tagline for the new service: “Legal advice from a top-rated lawyer on the phone.” Since it is Avvo, it would make sense if participating lawyers had to maintain a 9+ Avvo rating, for example, but nothing on the website suggests that is the case.

Update from Avvo:

[I]t’s easy to miss the statement on our Advisor page, but “top-rated” means an attorney has been positively reviewed, receiving 4-5 stars from clients. We note the quality guarantee, and also guarantee a customer’s money back if he/she isn’t satisfied with his/her session.

Bob Abrogi also posted a followup:

In order to participate in the program, a lawyer must have an Avvo rating of 7.5 or higher and client ratings of four out of five stars. Lawyers must apply to participate in the program and are screened based on their ratings.

Makes sense.


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  • Mark N. Lazar

    So its a loss-leader for Avvo? I’m curious to know what they do with the data they collect.

  • Bill Yanger

    Makes sense? Really? To whom? Economics (fees) aside, this concept is ill-conceived. Individuals, businesses and the people who own and run businesses and who pay for advice based on a ticking stopwatch deserve the results received. Thoughtful consideration of issues is fact and circumstance specific. Providing advice as if there is a chess board stop-clock sitting on the desk is, pun intended, a ticking time bomb. I’m a rated AVVO lawyer, an AVVO fan and I am confident AVVO provides significant value to the consumer. But stopwatch lawyering? No, thank you.