“I won pro se. … Why … would you put your fate in the hands of a total stranger?”

From commenter Iwonprose on Randall’s post “Does More Pro Se Litigants = Fewer Clients?”:

My experience with attorneys is that they don’t really care about you and only want paid. My opinion is they are overpaid and rarely ever do a good job. You know more about your case than they do. You are more interested in winning than they are. You only have one client to concentrate on, yourself. Why if you can read would you put your fate in the hands of a total stranger?

(image: http://www.flickr.com/photos/marcwathieu/5262973011/)

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  • Jennifer Moore

    I had a lovely consultation with a potential client this week regarding a harassment matter. She provided me with a copy of the harassment petition and asked me to help her to decide whether to contest the petition. I reviewed the factual allegations of the petition, one by one, and her response was total shock. She was completely unable to recall reading at least half a dozen of the factual allegations, even though she had read the document several times. I see this phenomenon fairly often. It’s hard to read horrible things about yourself, and it’s even harder to have to defend yourself against claims that you cannot understand.

    Also, this week, a client brought in a simple motion. She has a viable legal defense, but the case has a very small nominal value. Her question was whether she should hire an attorney to help her. In this case, she will be well served by hiring an attorney, because an attorney can help educate the Court on the law that will protect her. This isn’t law that is written in the statutes. This is case law.

    Courts have become more accessible to individuals representing themselves. It is certainly possible to win your case without an attorney, especially if your case is a simple factual dispute. Or, if your case is a legal slam-dunk. But, it does seem to me that you may not be in the best position to determine if you will do well without an attorney.

  • David White

    anyone can represent themselves. but they usually end up trying to get the judge to explain everything to them.

  • Dan

    Let’s follow this logical chain. I care about my own health more than anyone else would care about mine. Doctors often over-treat (full body diagnostics anyone) just to run up large bills for the insurance company. Medicare fraud is rampant. Malpractice is always a concern. Why should I trust my health to a doctor, when I can treat myself? Next time that I’ve got a problem with my heart, I’ll just perform my own surgery.

  • Astraea_Muse

    Surely I will do better by filling my own teeth, and setting my own bones, than by putting my fate in the hands of a total stranger.

    Some pro se litigants are very smart and handle things will, but they are vastly outnumbered by people who just can’t deal with reality.

  • spoonyfork69

    I have fought a collection agency & won. Didn’t get to go to court though. The Collections attempted to collect an old debt, the court costs I was unaware about, from a domestic relations case over 11 years ago. I was able to locate a Revised Code online that stated the Statute Limitations being 10 years max. I explained that to the collections, and haven’t heard from them ever since.