Google Chromecast: Trial Presentation Game Changer?

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Even in well-equipped courtrooms, video trial presentations are a pain. There’s figuring out what equipment they have versus what you have to haul into the courthouse, making sure connectors are compatible, coordinating between your tech people and theirs … in short, a pain.

But Google’s announcement of the Chromecast app and device Wednesday morning may start making video trial presentations a lot easier. And, miraculously, without breaking the bank.

Google Chromecast is a $35 dongle that connects to any HDMI port (television screen or computer monitor), finds a Wi-Fi network, and allows the user to broadcast from an Android device to the television/monitor. Youtube and Netflix interfaces will allow you to hit a single button and forward that video to the television/monitor, too. Google Music streaming to the television is also supported.

So … no more projectors? No more cables? No more compatibility issues? Maybe:

First, Chromecast is affordable. For a modest amount of money, users can connect devices to televisions and present information to juries or clients. The product seems to require very little technical knowledge, thereby making it easy-to-use. And finally, it’s a cross-platform product, which means that iOS lawyers won’t need an expensive Apple TV to run TrialPad, and Android users can use their devices to present information.

(h/t: The Droid Lawyer)

(image:http://www.flickr.com/photos/blltz/9360981538/)

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  • Jim Pattillo

    How is this different than apple airplay with apple tv?

    • legalofficeguru

      It’s not display device-specific, for one thing.

      • Jim Pattillo

        The apple set up is not display specific either. I run it on any projector or flat panel, regardless of brand. It is device specific though. I guess that just depends on whether you want to use apple or not.

        • legalofficeguru

          And whether you want to pay $35 versus $100+.

    • 1. Not device specific
      2. Costs less
      3. Runs on mobile and laptops (same as Airplay/Apple TV)

      • It is specific to Android. Coincidentally, there is an airplay app for Google TV already to stream from iOS devices and an android app that can stream to AppleTV.

        • Nope. I’m sure as soon as Apple gets its developer issues figured out Chromecast will be available in the App Store. Plus, there is an extension for Chrome browser that makes it available to any device. During the event yesterday they demoed the product on a Windows laptop. Non-device specific. Goodbye Apple TV.

        • Also, one of the demos involved an iPhone playing Netflix and Pandora.

  • metasandwich

    I don’t believe Chromecast permits Device to Device streaming as this article presumes. For example, you will not be able to stream a video stored onyour android or iOS device to the chromecast device, you will have to first upload the content to youtube or somewhere it can be accessed on a device’s chrome browser and then stream it. This is not as simple or streamlined as AirPlay.