Workflowy Review

productivity-guide-cover

Personal Productivity for Lawyers

This quick-start guide to Getting Things Done and Inbox Zero also includes two shortcuts for those who want the benefits of GTD without having to learn the system.

Having trouble organizing notes and to-do lists in a way that helps you complete tasks? Before you get another freaky tattoo, check out Workflowy.

It just may be the world’s best tool for taking notes and making lists.

Here’s why I believe WorkFlowy will soon be one of your favorite productivity tools too.

Workflowy?

I could try to explain how Workflowy works, but fortunately for us both, there are these videos:

If that wasn’t clear, head over to the Workflowy YouTube Channel to learn more about How to use WorkFlowy.

Getting Started With Workflowy

To me, the real “magic” of Workflowy is its simplicity in zooming in and out of different “pieces of work” and the ability to tag and filter.

Organizing Lists

Tagging & Filtering

Workflowy has a bunch of other basic commands including: search, move, complete, star and duplicate.

Workflowy Collaboration

Workflowy has recently added sharing and collaboration over any sublist. Violin teacher Paul Wood has shared an example Workflowy he uses to communicate with students on his blog.

How much does Workflowy Cost?

Currently, Workflowy is free. With the free account, you can create 500 WorkFlowy items per month. However, if you need more, there are two ways to get more.

For every person you tell about WorkFlowy, they’ll give you both 250 more monthly items.

You can also upgrade to WorkFlowy Pro which is $4.99 per month, or $49 if you pay for a year. A Pro account also includes some additional functionality:

WorkFlowy   Organize your brain.

Coming Soon to Workflowy

While Workflowy currently lacks some of the key-features that you find in other to-do list tools (i.e. dates, calendar view, reminders), like Remember the Milk, most of Workflowy’s major faults are on the roadmap:

What features are coming up for WorkFlowy?
The following are some of the features we plan on building into WorkFlowy. We’ll implement them with the standard WorkFlowy style and simplicity.

  • Offline access
  • Dates & reminders
  • Better importing options
  • Colors and formatting
  • Collaboration improvements
  • API

While Workflowy might not be the right fit in terms of comprehensive project management, I’ve found it ideal for organizing lists and notes.

Workflowy

Reviewed by Gyi Tsakalakis on .
Summary: The note-taking list-making tool.
Description: Quite simply, Workflowy is probably the best tool for taking notes and making list ever.
Rating: 5

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  • Okay, I totally don’t need another productivity tool, but I just signed up anyway.

    • It’s pretty cool. If they add deadlines/calendar, etc. it could be a real competitor to some of the other to-do lists. I’ve found it especially strong for note-taking.

      • I think it’s more of a scratchpad than a to-do list. You can definitely do all this in Evernote, although obviously not with the “one sheet of paper” UI paradigm.

        It’s cool, but I don’t think I’ll be ditching Remember the Milk for it.

      • Kir Maximov

        If you need a similar tool with Due dates support – checkout out Checkvist.

  • Doug

    I am sorry, but I don’t have time to watch a bunch of videos that are put out by the company that you are “reviewing.” This review is nothing more than recycling the Youtube channel of the product. Please provide some original content if you expect your articles to be read.

    • That’s fair. However, in my defense, the first video is 45 seconds long. I concluded that you’d learn more from that 45 seconds than from reading 45 seconds of me trying to explain how it works.

    • Getoveryourself

      You had time to write this obnoxious note, Mr. Busy. How’d you manage to squeeze that in?

    • Ken

      This is the exact person who needs workflowy to better manage his/her time.

  • Litigator

    I don’t think I could use this at my law firm – there are confidentiality concerns with storing information in a cloud service not controlled by the law firm. My “to-do” list and notes will always contain confidential and privileged information that must remain secure. It does look useful, though.

  • Andrea J.

    I think Workflowy is more powerful as a cloud-based outliner rather than as a to-do list application. As someone who likes operating in the cloud, I have not found anything that is really satisfying when it comes to outlining. Google Docs doesn’t have any robust outlining features and neither does Evernote.

    Workflowy works great to outline a piece of writing, especially since you can collapse parts of it, go into only the parts you need to work on, and move sections around. The “note” feature is a good place to put in draft text for whatever you are working on.

    • If you’ve read David Allen’s Getting Things Done, I think it works really well as a “trusted collection bucket.”