Is the Courthouse the Best Social Networking Site for Lawyers?

website-design-guide-cover-2

Free: 10 Things the Best Law-Firm Website Designs Have in Common

For seven years, Lawyerist has published an annual list of the best law firm websites. Now, you can find out what they have in common.

According to Associate’s Mind, the best social networking site for lawyers is the courthouse. I’m pretty sure that’s tongue in cheek, because it definitely doesn’t apply to the vast array of lawyers whose business does not take place at the courthouse. I’m not even sure it applies to civil litigators, who don’t tend to hang around the courthouse to the same extent as criminal defense lawyers.

However, if the take away is to spend time with other lawyers, then I think the author has a very good point.

Subscribe

Get Lawyerist in Your Inbox, Daily

Current Articles
Current Lab Discussions
  • Wes

    It depends upon what an attorney is trying to accomplish in the long run. Are you a litigator? Are you looking for referrals? Are you a young attorney just starting? Then maybe it is. Older attorneys tend to respect the fact that your are busting your tail and once a relationship is developed, confidence may be established and overflow work could be referred out to you. Also it never hurts to build a relationship with court staff; clerks, court reporters, bailiffs, etc….you never know where a referral or help can come from.

  • It’s certainly meant to be tongue in cheek to some extent. If you’re a transactional guy doing bond work on the 64th floor in some skyrise in Chicago – it’s probably not worth your time to go to the courthouse.

    But for new layers right of law school without significant prospects, it’s the best place they could be. What’s shocking is how apprehensive they seem to be. Don’t worry, the grown-ups will let you come to the table! They’ll even be nice and offer some advice if you act accordingly.

    It’s probably one of the easiest ways to meet other lawyers outside of bar events. Of course, the easiest thing to do is sit at home in front of your computer connecting with people on LinkedIn. I’m sure that’s working out great for everyone.

  • It isn’t just new lawyers who can benefit from “hanging around” the courthouse.

    As an older attorney who transitioned from a practice that concentrated mainly in real estate work and straight into divorce and paternity trial practice, I can safely say that the courthouse is a great place to spend some time. As Wes points out, the relationships you build with court staff can be priceless and can lead to referrals. I have also signup people who (for whatever reason) deemed me approachable while they were going around trying to find help in the courthouse, asked me some questions about how to do something, and later ended up hiring me.

    I’ve discovered I’m not a fan of strictly networking events no matter how much I try; and all my “marketing” is online. But as Keith points out, sitting in front of the computer doesn’t necessarily translate into paying clients…sooner or later face or phone time is what will get the business going. And yes, the transactional guy/gal in Chicago, Miami, LA or wherever, may benefit from a different networking hot spot.