When Google released Google Drive, I was so excited that I moved all my Lawyerist and Bitter Lawyer files to it right away. Two months later, I am still using Google Drive, but I have moved some “mission-critical” files back to Dropbox, and I am still using Dropbox for my law firm’s files.

There are some awesome things about Google Drive, but it still has some issues that Google is, presumably, ironing out.

A couple of updates in, Google Drive is as quick and light on resources as Dropbox. It is also faster to startup (indexing and updating files), as far as I can tell. But twice in two months, Google Drive has forced me to disconnect my account and re-download the entire contents of my Google Drive. This means I had to manually update the files that hadn’t been updated as a result of the glitch.

Also, on numerous occasions, Google Drive has simply quit unexpectedly. When it crashes like this, it quits quietly, and the only indication that it is no longer working is the fact that its icon is missing from the system tray. On several occasions, this has left me with multiple un-synced files.

Because of these problems, I have moved my QuickBooks files back to Dropbox, which has crashed like once in several years, and has never forced me to re-download my files. With Google Drive, I just got tired of getting home and firing up QuickBooks on my laptop only to find that my QuickBooks file hadn’t synced up from my desktop at work.

There is one more drawback to Google Drive: app support. None of the Android or iPad apps that I use to edit text files supports it. As far as I can tell, in fact, almost no third-party software supports Google Drive as a way to access or sync files. That means all my blog post drafts have to stay in Dropbox, where my favorite text editor happily keeps them in sync and available across platforms.

All this is to say that, if you are using Dropbox, I don’t think there is a compelling reason to switch to Google Drive just yet.