Rakofsky’s Response to the Internet’s Motion to Dismiss

I forgot to write about this when it hit Twitter the other day, but young lawyer Joseph Rakofsky’s response to the internet’s motion to dismiss his defamation lawsuit hit Twitter the other day:

I realize the idea of wading through a poorly-written, 87-page brief may not sound like fun, but this one is totally worth it. Read carefully, and you will find gems like this one, on page 67:

There are also lots of mentions of internet website blogs, an ominous-sounding Link Network conspiracy, and allegations that Scott Greenfield makes truckloads of money from Simple Justice, despite his frequent assertions to the contrary.

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  • William Chuang

    Someone should tell this guy that when you find yourself in a hole, stop digging. The problem is that a few of the Rakofsky defendants settled. They paid him $5,000 to go away, and now he thinks he can get $5,000 from each of the 81 defendants. Now he thinks he has a $405,000 payday waiting for him.

    The entire case is pretty terrifying. A man is on trial for murder, and is offered a plea of five years in prison. His attorney rejects the offer and goes to trial, and completely butchers it. From the moving papers in the Internet case, it sounds like Rakofsky couldn’t even serve process—how can he handle a murder trial!? Answer: he doesn’t. The court declares a mistrial, which Rakofsky brags about, not realizing that his client is sitting in jail in pretrial detention because of the mistrial. Oh, yeah, by the way, his client was just sentenced to ten years in jail. He is going to serve an extra five years in prison because of legal incompetence.

    I don’t understand how this guy has escaped sanctions. (NJ suspended him for a few months but that was because he literally didn’t pay his dues.)

  • Guest

    I’d rather meet Joseph Rakofsky than David Boies, Joseph Jamail or any other famous lawyer. Rakofsky is the biggest celebrity lawyer on the internet!

    I would ask him WTF were you thinking? Couldn’t you try a misdemeanor battery or two before you stepped up on a murder?