3M MP225 Mobile Projector Review

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There is a short list of essential technology for the attorney on the move.

You could always carry a portable whiteboard, but that’s not nearly as snazzy as having a nice projector that you can stick in your computer bag. Fortunately, 3M’s MP 225 Mobile Projector has got you covered.

What I like about the projector

The projector is very easy to use out of the box. It comes with two cables — one to attach it to your iPhone or iPad and one for charging the battery. As a side note, the packaging of the product made me yearn for Apple’s awesome packaging. The quickstart guide was buried in the bottom and even then, the quickstart guide would really benefit from a step 1, step 2, etc. approach. The information is all there, but it would really benefit from some reorganization and clarity.

Aside from my gripes about the packaging and instructions, the device itself is very easy to use. The controls are simple and the buttons do what they are supposed to do. Power, volume up/down, and mute. In that sense, it is almost idiot proof, which means at least half of most attorneys could figure this thing out. It’s also relatively small — I’d say about half the size of a brick — so you can easily fit it in a briefcase or computer bag.

The big test was picture quality, and it passed with flying colors. I was projecting onto a white wall in daylight and it looked pretty darn good. I imagine that using a screen and dimming the lights would make it look even better (which the directions recommend). The focus was sharp and again, pictures and videos looked very good. I’m speculating, but I think if you used an actual screen, it would look similar to a high-definition television.

If you find yourself needing a portable projector for presentations, I think this would certainly get the job done.

What I don’t like about the projector

The gripes I have are fairly minor and will hopefully be fixed as 3M tweaks their product. The cable did not have a tight grip in either my iPad or iPhone, which means it fell out pretty easily. If you are using your iPhone or iPad as your remote for your presentation, that could become pretty annoying and cause havoc with a presentation.

Although the picture quality was great, I’m miffed there isn’t an autofocus feature or button. The focus turn dial works fine, but it would be nice to worry about that only when necessary. Most projectors with autofocus work really well. Adding that feature would potentially make this projector 100% idiot proof.

The final gripe is more of an iPhone/iPad gripe. When connected to the iPhone, it only projects pictures and videos, it does not duplicate or mirror your screen. I don’t think that’s a dealbreaker, but it is annoying. When connected to the iPad, it does mirror the entire device. Unfortunately, that requires a special cable that was not included with my test unit, so I was not able to test it out.

Who should buy it

Any attorney who frequently makes presentations and wants to bring their own technology. This projector is small enough to stick into your computer bag. Which means you can literally bring your presentation anywhere and have it look darn good.

Score

3M MP225 Mobile Projector

Reviewed by Randall Ryder on .

Summary: 3M’s MP225 Mobile Projector is easy to use, portable, and produces excellent images when connected to an iPhone or iPad.

Overall score: 5 (out of 5)

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  • What’s the effective range? Would it work in a courtroom, or is it meant for a small conference room?

  • My understanding is that they suggest a maximum diagonal size of 80 inches, which puts you at about 8 feet back. I think you could use it in a courtroom, as long as the screen or wall is within that distance.

  • Seriously? While it may be “cute,” you’d be rather embarrassed if you were to assume that 32 lumens would light up a courtroom screen. The minimum standard courtroom projector is 3000 lumens – just a little bit brighter. And “for up to 2 hours?” I hope none of your witnesses have much to say, or that they don’t need to show the jury much in the way of evidence.

    Now maybe if you can get the Court to allow you to turn off all of the lights, and assuming there are no windows in the room — well, probably not even then either.

    Products like this are intended more for a hotel room or that “emergency” opportunity to present something to just a few people.

    I have a few articles on trial technology on my blog, including this one about courtroom projectors:
    http://trial-technology.blogspot.com/2011/10/courtroom-projectors-screens-and.html

  • Thank you, Sam. I suppose if I were nice, at the expense of allowing my clients to try things in court which I knew were sure to end up in disaster, I wouldn’t be called a jerk. Then again, I wouldn’t be called a consultant, either.

    I’m not saying this isn’t a cool ultra-portable projector. I am saying it’s not suitable for attorneys presenting evidence, except perhaps when you need to travel to a very small meeting, deposition, Mediation or Settlement Conference – the same places you might be able to use an iPad.

    • Consultants are required to be sarcastic jerks?

  • The projector reviewed might above might be fine for personal use, or possibly a very small group, but should never be considered for use in a courtroom. It’s not powerful enough, and cannot be left on all day like a normal courtroom projector.

    If you or your readers are interested in a court-ready projector, look at something with 3000 lumens or greater, 1024×768 resolution, not DLP, and a short-throw lens is nice.

    Hopefully now I’ve removed myself from sarcastic jerk status.

    • Thanks for the tip, I’ll see if I can get a test model to review. I wasn’t offended by your snark, but why not make that comment in the first place?

  • Sure thing. All of the specs were in my article, but I didn’t really spell them out in the comment. In any event, I love reading Lawyerist — keep up the good work.

  • Wow i think someones paradigm is set to a specific narrow focus and not realize hat the trail attorney is a rare breed and not all attys go to trial.
    thanks for the review RR I like to add this option for when I go to a mediation something.