Avvo, the controversial lawyer rating site, comes to Minnesota

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Avvo has finally come to Minnesota. The controversial lawyer rating site has been sued, panned, and lauded. Whatever your feelings on it, Avvo is here, and soon your clients will be looking you up on Avvo and reviewing your performance.

On the plus side, Avvo lets lawyers claim their profile and add information like practice areas, contact information, publications, etc. Lawyers can also raise their profile by answering questions in the “Answers & Advice” section of Avvo.

Like it or not, people will soon be shopping around for attorneys. Best get to Avvo, claim your profile, and ask your favorite clients to review you.

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Current Lab Discussions
  • I was always leery of Avvo because they wanted my credit card number to verify my identity in order for me to claim my profile, and I am just not comfortable giving that out. There must be another way of doing that.

  • Don’t you give that out when shopping online? Or when checking in at the airport, for that matter?

  • As an indication of how reliable Avvo will be as a rating service, I went from a 5.7/10 to a 9.5/10 just by claiming my profile and filling in the blanks. While some of the information I provided does show something about my experience, a lot of it does not.

  • Steve – there is another way – you can claim your profile using the email address you have on file with the state bar assocation. This option should show up on the “claim your profile” page – if it doesn’t, then we don’t have that email address on file and you must use the credit card.

    -Conrad from Avvo

  • Greg

    Sam (and Conrad):

    You have to admit that a numerical “rating” system based on a “mathematical model” is dubious at best, if not really just the hook that differentiates Avvo from other services. A numerical ranking is incredibly arbitrary and, from what I can tell from looking through the site, reliant more upon an attorney’s presence on the internet than most other things. I’m intrigued by the service but turned off by the pretty unreliable ‘numerical’ ranking that can be fairly easily manipulated. If this is a consumer driven service, then consumers deserve better.

  • I certainly agree. It didn’t take any client or even colleague input for me to go from 5.7 to 9.5. I may deserve a 9.5, but it is hard to imagine one could accurately determine that based only on my input.

  • Greg

    Well, you are lucky. I started at 6.3 and am stuck in the doldrums of the 7s. It’s rather funny and fascinating to me, as I’d love to see what’s under the engine that generates the ratings. Happy birthday, by the way.

  • No idea. Seems almost arbitrary.

    And thanks!

  • Eric Cooperstein

    I got mine to go from a 6.6 to a 9.8, but what was odd was that initially there was no change, then I went back the next day and it had gone up to 9.1. So I kept entering more information, and it kept going up. It seems to like articles and speaking engagements in your field of practice.

    Of course it’s almost completely arbitrary, but once I claimed my profile and got stuck with a 6.6, I couldn’t leave that out there. It seems that anyone who has been a SuperLawyer within the past few years is automatically a 10.

    So many people have high scores, it reminds me of a line from the movie “The Incredibles.” The bad guy is killing all the old superheroes and then plans to sell gadgets that will give ordinary people super powers. Then he says “And when everyone is super, no one will be!” With Avvo, every lawyer can be a SuperLawyer.