Virtual meetings and virtual assistants are becoming more and more popular. We use a virtual assistant and although she is quite good at her job, there are times when it would be nice to share screens to further clarify things.

Skype will let you share screens, but if Skype is not your thing, or you need to talk to multiple people, consider using Mikogo for virutal meetings.

How it works

Mikogo works on computers running both Windows and Mac OS X. The site suggests that you first connect via phone to the other participant(s). Once you are both on the phone, one person initiates the Mikogo session and sends an ID to the other members of the conversation, who then go to the website and sign in.

One of the nice things about Mikogo is that it supports up to 10 participants. If you need to show something to more than one employee, they can all join in the fun.

You can also switch the presenter at any point. If an employee or virtual assistant has a question about something on their screen, that be changed to the main screen.

If you prefer to retain control of the session, you can still assign remote keyboard and/or mouse control to a participant. Another option is to allow participants to literally point things out with pointers that appear onscreen.

Should lawyers use it?

The upside to Skype is that you are already connected via audio and/or video feed. With Mikogo, you need a separate phone connection. Mikogo does offer conference numbers that participants can call into, but that is still an extra step.

Mikogo appears to be designed for chats involving more than two people, which is very nice. The fact that you can have up to 10 participants, allow other users to take remote control of your screen, and allow them to point things out with pointers makes it easy to conduct meetings with multiple people.

Depending on the circumstances, Mikogo might be the best option for your next online meeting.