Making the Most From Working at Home

productivity-guide-cover

Personal Productivity for Lawyers

This quick-start guide to Getting Things Done and Inbox Zero also includes two shortcuts for those who want the benefits of GTD without having to learn the system.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/melancon/3448949726/

If you can afford it, having an office outside of your home can be very beneficial to your practice. You should also, however, design your practice so that you can work from anywhere. If you decide to work from home for the day, here are some tips for staying productive.

Relax

The biggest advantage to working from home is that you should be able to relax more. You do not need to tuck in your shirt (or wear one), comb your hair, or have proper posture.

Theoretically, you can use the extra time to get more done. The relaxed state of mind should help you look at cases and issues with a new state of mind—and hopefully get some inertia on stagnant cases.

Create a space you can work in

I used to think working on the couch was ok, but I have changed my mind. Do not do “work” where you relax. Working with the TV will make you half as productive. Make a small home office, or even just work in a room of your house that you are rarely in (if you live in a mansion). The goal is to be in a space that has the advantage of the relaxed home mentality, but will also allow you to focus on work.

Take care of things around the house

I know, if you are doing stuff around the house, you are not working on “work.” Look at it this way: if you spend an hour during the day taking care of household tasks, that means you should be able to focus more when you are at office. If you take half an hour to mow the grass, you will not spend the last two hours at your office hurrying to leave so that you can mow the grass.

In other words, take advantage of the situation, and if you can get some non-work tasks done, do them.

Subscribe

Get Lawyerist in Your Inbox, Daily

Current Articles
Current Lab Discussions