Report: Online Searchers Motivated to Find and Hire Lawyers

Please see my comment on this post. — Ed.

LexisNexis has released the results of its recent Attorney Research Selection Survey by The Research Intelligence Group (TRIG), and provides some interesting information on the outcomes of consumers’ online legal searches.

The evidence is pretty clear: Consumers aren’t just searching for legal information and attorneys out of random curiosity. The majority of them are highly motivated to find a lawyer and hire one right away. It’s crucial for law firms seeking to grow their business to appreciate this reality and develop online marketing programs that increase their visibility in front of prospective clients who are searching for information and help on the Web.

Fully 57% of online searchers hired a lawyer after searching for one online. This confirms what we have known for a while: people aren’t using the Yellow Pages for their lawyer searches anymore. Granted, most of my clients come from networking and referrals anyway, but when deciding where to invest marketing resources, it’s pretty clear that nixing print media and focusing on one’s online presence is the way to go.

You can download a copy of the full results of the Attorney Research Selection Survey here [pdf].

(photo: Shutterstock: 17484)

  • http://lawyerist.com/author/samglover/ Sam Glover

    Given the immense conflict of interest when a seller of websites and SEO services conducts a survey like this, I’m going to go ahead and call it meaningless.

    Don’t get me wrong, I think lawyers need websites, but I’m not prepared to accept any findings or implications of a study like this. It is, however, a good example of the lengths to which internet marketers will go to mislead wide-eyed, gullible lawyers who don’t know anything about marketing their services online.

    For those wondering why I’m being critical of a post on Lawyerist, I believe it is our responsibility to be the first to admit our mistakes. Republishing a Lexis Nexis marketing piece as if it were news is a mistake.

    Most of our contributors — including Graham — publish their own posts. I don’t see them until you do. As a result, our contributors are responsible for the content of their own posts, but I am ultimately responsible for the quality of what shows up on Lawyerist. This post didn’t meet our standards, and I will make sure all our contributors understand why not.

  • http://www.AschemanSmith.com Landon Ascheman

    I think there may be a logic fallacy in your conclusion:

    “Fully 57% of online searchers hired a lawyer after searching for one online. This confirms what we have known for a while: people aren’t using the Yellow Pages for their lawyer searches anymore. ”

    Just because people that do an online search are inclined to hire an attorney doesn’t say anything about people that use the Yellow Pages. It appears you took a jump (although possibly correct) without the proper support.